History of Dhaka Parivar

Dhaka is a gotra (clan) of Jats found in Haryana, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh states of India.They are mainly found in Sikar, Jhunjhunu, Churu districts of Rajasthan. Dhaka is the biggest Gotra in Sikar district. Second Largest Gotra of JATs. Juliasar village in Sikar district was founded by Julia Dhaka Jat. Julia Jat had 18 sons who founded 18 villages. Dhaka gotra Jats founded 47 villages.


History Of Dhaka Parivar

Alexander Cunningham writes about The Sangala of Alexander, which has long ago been recognized in the Sakala of the Brahmans and the Sāgal of the Buddhists.

Alexander Cunningham further writes that In the time of Hwen Thsang She-kie-lo, or Sakala, was in ruins, and the chief town of the district was Tse-Kia, or Chekia, which may also be read as Dhaka or Taka.

It is also likely that the clan may get the name from Dhak tree. Alexander Cunningham mentions that On leaving Sakala, the Chinese pilgrim Xuanzang traveled eastward into a forest of Po-lo-she trees, where his party encountered fifty brigands, who robbed them of their clothes. M. Julien, who has properly rendered Hwen Thsang Po-lo-she by Palasa, the Butea frondosa, or Dhak tree.

The Brahmanical accounts of Sakala have been collected from the Mahabharata by Professor Lassen in his ' Pentapotamia Indica.' (pp. 73, 74) According to that poem, Sakala, the capital of the Madras, who are also called Jartikas and Bahikas, was situated on the Apaga rivulet to the west of the Iravati, or Ravi river. It was approached from the east side by pleasant paths through the Pilu forest,

" Sami-pilu kariranām vaneshu sukhavartmasu." (शमी पीलु करीराणां वनेषु सुखवर्त्मसु) (VIII.30.24)

Alexander Cunningham mentions that The country is still well known as Madras, or the district of the Madras, which is said by some to extend from the Bias to the Jhelam, but by others only to the Chenab. Regarding the Apaga rivulet, I believe that it may be recognized in the Ayak Nadi, a small stream which has its rise in the Jammu hills to the north-east of Sialkot. After passing Sialkot the Ayak runs westerly near Sodhra, wherein the rainy season it throws off its superfluous water in the Chenab. It then turns to the south-south-west past Banka and Nandanwa to Bhutala and continues this same course till within a few miles of Asarur. There it divides into two branches, which, after passing to the east and west of Asarur, rejoin at 2½ miles to the south of Sangalawala Tiba. Its course is marked in the revenue survey maps for 15 miles to the south-west of Sangala, where it is called the Nananwa canal. An intelligent man of Asarur informed me that he had seen the bed of the Nananwa 20 kos to the south-west and that he had always heard that it fell into the Ravi a long way off. This, then, must be Arrian's "small rivulet" near which Alexander pitched his camp, at 100 stadia, or 11½ miles, to the east of the Akesines, below its junction with the Hydaspes. At that time, therefore, the water of the Ayak must have flowed for a long distance below Sangala, and most probably fell into the Ravi, as stated by my informant. Near Asarur and Sangala, the Ayak is now quite dry at all seasons ; but there must have been water in it at Dhakawala only 24 miles above Asarur, even so late as the reign of Shah Jahan, when his son Dara Shekoh drew a canal from that place to his hunting seat at Shekohpura, which is also called the Ayak, or Jhilri canal.

Dr. Naval Viyogi provides us information from the Naga records. Dhaka is also the name of the capital of Bangladesh. It is named after Dhakeshwari i.e. the goddess of Dhaka's. According to Dr. Naval Viyogi In a period of third century AD, many hoards of Taka coins have been recovered from the Nagpur region, which was introduced by the Taka Nagas of North-West. Linguists have informed that these Taka people reached and ruled in the region of Dhaka of Bangla Desh since the word 'Dhaka' is a linguistic (Pali) variation of Taka. In the second act of Sanskrit play mrcchakatika a dialect has been used by the author, known as Takki. Taki, Takka or Dhakka is the Prakrit dialect which has been called by Paschal language of East Bengal spoken around Dhaka, but there is another interpretation too, since word 'Ta' has been changed to 'Dha' due to the tendency of change from Sanskrit to Pali or Prakrit as cited above, hence the original word is Taka from which Dhaka has been derived.

Dhaka is one of the names of Nagavanshi Kings who ruled from 2nd to 5th century. As per History of Sanskrit Literature (1859), p. 267 and F. Max Muller Dhata changed to Dacca or Dhaka (Sanskrit to Pali or English) over a period of time.

According to historian Dasharatha Sharma, the ancient name Darbhakaksha (दर्भकक्ष) mentioned in Chauhan history is identified as present village Dhaka's in Fatehpur tahsil of Sikar district in Rajasthan. It was one of the vishayas of Chauhans.

According to Bards, It is said that all Dhaka's were killed in the war when a sole person in the womb of Chahar lady of Sidhmukhsurvived, who was Juliya Dhaka. Juliya Dhaka moved from here and came to a spot in Sikar district and founded Juliasar after him. It is near border of Churu district on Laxmangarh-Salasar road (NH-65). Nearby village Magluna (east). Julia Jat had 18 sons who founded 18 villages. Dhaka gotra Jats founded 45 villages. All Dhaka's have spread from Juliasar.

Cities and mountains named on Dhaka's name:

There are many Cities and mountains named on Dhaka's name like Kala Dhaka (Black Mountains) and Gora Dhakamountains on the border of Pakistan and Afghanistan. A village is also known as Dhaka nearby these mountains.

Origin

According to Ompal Singh Tugania's book based on the records of Bhats which is a community of bards and genealogists in North India, Dhaka's are one of few Jat clans having origin from Chauhans. According to Dr Naval Viyogi In a period of third century AD many hoards of Taka coins have been recovered from Nagpur region, which were introduced by the Taka Nagas of North-West. Linguists have informed that these Taka people reached and ruled in the region of Dhaka of Bangla Desh, since the word ' Dhaka' is a linguistic (Pali) variation of Taka. In the second act of Sanskrit play mrcchakatika a dialect has been used by author, known as Takki. Taki, Takka or Dhakka is the Prakrit dialect which has been called by Pischal language of East Bengal spoken around Dhaka, but there is another interpretation too, since word 'Ta' has been changed to 'Dha' due to the tendency of change from Sanskrit to Pali or Prakrit as cited above, hence the original word is Taka from which Dhaka has been derived.

Distribution in Uttar Pradesh

Baghpat district Dhaka Jats live in Dhikoli village. This has the population of about 10 thousand and other nearby Dhaka villages are Augti, Patauli, Saidhpurwhere Hindu Jats live. The Rataul Village is habituated by Muslim Jats of Dhaka gotra in Baghpat district of Uttar Pradesh. Bijnor district Villages are (Chajlet),(Tangraula).

Distribution in Rajasthan

There are number of villages in Rajasthan after Dhaka clan. Dhaka is a village in Churu district of Rajasthan, India. The biggest war between Rathores and Johiya Jats was fought at this Dhaka village near Sidhmukh. Dhaka Ka Baas is a village in Jhunjhunu district of Rajasthan, India. Nearest town is Mandawa which is also a famous tourist destination.

Villages in Sikar district
Alakhpura Bogan, Akhaypura, Badhadar, Basni, Bathot, Bhau ji ki Dhani, Bhojasar, Bhojasar Bada, Bhukarbas, Bhuma Bada, Bhunwala, Chelasi, Dadia, Dalmas, Datujla, Dhaka ki Dhani (Sabalpura), Dhani Dabar, Dhani Rampura, Dhani Sohanji (Netarwas), Dholpalia, Dinarpura, Fatehpur, Fatehpura, Garinda, Ghirania Bara, Hapas, Hardayalpura, Harsawa, Jalalsar, Jasrasar, Katrathal, Khatipura(Jasrasar), Lalana, Lalana (Sutot), Laxman ka Bas, Losal, Magloona, Mandota, Moondwara, Nabipura, Netarwas, Paldi, Patoda, Rinau, Roru Badi, Sanwloda Purohitan, Shivsinghpura, Sigdola Bada, Sihot Chhoti, Sikar, Talab ki dhani, Thathawata Piran, Tunawan, Turkasia

Villages in Churu district
Bas Dhakan, Biramsar, Dhakali, Hardesar, Jaleu(Ratangarh), Lalgarh (Rajasthan), Sitsar, Barjangsar, sahawa (taranagar)

Villages in Jhunjhunu district
Dhakamandi, Bhurasar ka Bas, Dhaka Ka Baas (Suopura), Khohri (Tamkor), Ladusar, Manota Jatan, Nathasar, Silarpuri,meethwas

Villages in Nagaur district
Bamna, Chuntisara, Degana, Nagaur, Solayan, Thebri, Chhapri, Kerpura, shivdanpura, lamba,

Villages in Jodhpur district
Jodhpur, Falaudi, Ratkudia,

Villages in Barmer district
Balotra, Band, Ranasar, Kabuli, Chohtan, Dhorimana, Gadhra, Baitu, Sonari, Shobhala Darshan, Sara Jhund, Adel, Nokhra,

Villages in Jaisalmer district
Bhaniyana, Chandhan

Villages in Chittorgarh district
Gangrar,

Villages in Ajmer district
Ajmer,

Locations in Jaipur city
Ambabari, Bagru Walon ka Rasta, Bajrang Vihar, Chandlai (Chaksu), Galta Road, Ganesh Colony (Khatipura), Himmat Nagar, Jagannathpura (Khatipura), Jawahar Nagar, Jhotwara, Khatipura, Malviy Nagar, Mansarowar Colony, Murlipura Scheme, Purani Basti, Queens Road, Sanganer, Sanjay Colony, Shastri Nagar, Sodala, Tonk Road, Vaishali Nagar

Villages in Jaipur district
Chandlai (1), Ladana (2), Mohabbatpura (1), Nondpura (1), Udaypuriya (3),

Villages in Hanumangarh district

Beganwali Dholipal, Kishanpura Utradha, Mothsara Shergarh, Sangaria, Ghotra Khalsa

villages in sriganganagar district
(dhingawali jattan ) (dhaka wali dhani village of Ch. Mahaveer Singh Dhaka & Ch. Ranveer Dhaka)

Distribution in Hanumangarh

Villages in Hanumangarh
PHEPHANA, (Village of Ch. HETRAM DHAKA,Ch.RANJEET SINGH DHAKA)

Distribution in Haryana

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Villages in Sirsa District
Bharokhan, Beharwala, Dhukara, Panihari

Villages in Hisar District
Kabrel, Kharia, Jagan, Ramsara

Villages in [Bhiwani] District
Ghasola (Bhiwani), Malkosh

Villages in Sonepat District
Seveli (Sonepat),

Villages in [Fatehabad] District
Dhani Ishar, Bhuthan kalan,

Villages in [Rohtak] District
Sundana, Gudhan, Chamaiya